1879 Silver Dollar Value and Price Chart

Silver dollars minted in 1879 are worth a fair amount of money, depending on their condition and mint mark. Circulated coins can be worth anywhere from $45 for a Philadelphia coin to $475 for a Carson City coin. Uncirculated coins in MS 65 condition are $575 for no mint mark dollar, $8,000 for 1879 S dollar, $2,450 for a 1879 O dollar and $23,000 for a 1879 CC dollar.

1879 was a landmark year in both technological and architectural innovation. It was also a time of great political change, as new governments took hold in Japan and the United States. It was also the year when the Morgan silver dollar celebrated its second birthday.

Do you have a 1879 Silver Dollar in your pocket? If so, it might be worth a lot more than you think! This coin is quite rare, and there are only a handful of them in existence in pristine condition. In this blog post, we will discuss the history of the 1879 Silver Dollar and tell you how much it is worth today. We will also talk about what makes this coin so unique and valuable to collectors. So if you’re curious about this interesting piece of currency, keep reading!

History of Morgan Silver Dollars

The Morgan silver dollar was first minted in 1878, and over the next few years, it became increasingly popular. By 1879, the Morgan silver dollar was the primary coin in circulation in the United States. The dollar was minted until 1904, when production was halted due to a shortage of silver. In 1921, production of the Morgan silver dollar resumed, but only for one year. The coin was then replaced by the Peace silver dollar.

The Morgan silver dollar is named for its designer, George T. Morgan. George T. Morgan was an English engraver and coin designer. Born in Birmingham, Morgan began his career as an apprentice to a metal engraver. He later relocated to the United States, where he worked for the Philadelphia Mint. During his time at the Mint, Morgan designed several coins, including the silver dollar.

Morgan silver dollars were minted at seven different mints: Philadelphia, New York, Denver, San Francisco, Carson City, New Orleans, and West Point. Over the course of its production, more than 642 million Morgan silver dollars were struck. Today, the Morgan silver dollar is a highly sought-after collectible coin.

But what makes a silver coin from this period so interesting? The Bland-Allison Act was one of the first pieces of legislation enacted in the United States in an effort to address the issue of inflation. The act, passed in 1878, required the government to purchase a minimum amount of silver each month and to coin it into silver coins. The goal was twofold: to increase the supply of currency in circulation and to provide assistance to farmers who were struggling with falling prices for their crops.

1879 Morgan Silver Dollar Identification Guide

1879 Morgan Silver Dollar Identification Guide

1879 Morgan Silver Dollar Specifications

WEIGHT 26.73 grams
DIAMETER 38.10 millimeters
METAL 90% Silver, 10% Copper
EDGE Reeded
DESIGNER George T. Morgan

If you’re a coin collector, then you know that the 1879 Morgan silver dollar is a coveted piece. But what makes this coin so special? Let’s take a look at its features. Struck in 90% silver and 10% copper, 1879 Morgan Silver Dollars contain .77344 ounces of silver and have a diameter of 38.1 mm. Weighing 26.73 grams, these coins were minted at the Philadelphia, New Orleans, San Francisco, and Carson City Mints.

On the obverse side, Lady Liberty is featured in a profile view looking to the left. The words “E Pluribus Unum” are inscribed at the top of the coin, and the date is located at the bottom. The coin is surrounded by stars, which represent the original states of the union. On the reverse side, a bald eagle is pictured clasping arrows and an olive branch in its claws. The words “In God We Trust”, “United States of America”, and “One Dollar” are inscribed on the coin.

The coin was minted in several different locations, and each location used a different mint mark. As a result, the mint mark can be a helpful tool for identifying a Morgan silver coin. Mint marks, when present, can be found below the bow on the backside of the coin or under the tail of the bald eagle on the right. No mint mark means Philadelphia, CC means Carson City, S means San Francisco, and O means New Orleans.

1879 Morgan Silver Dollar No Mint Mark

1879 Morgan Silver Dollar No Mint Mark

1879 CC Morgan Silver Dollar

1879 CC Morgan Silver Dollar

1879 S Morgan Silver Dollar

1879 S Morgan Silver Dollar

1879 O Morgan Silver Dollar

1879 O Morgan Silver Dollar

 

1879 CC Morgan Dollars: CC Over CC

The 1879 CC Morgan silver dollar is a coin with two different variations. The first variation is the clear CC mint mark. The second variation is the CC over CC, also known as the capped die variety.

1879 CC Morgan Dollars CC Over CC

1879 S Morgan Dollars

One major variety of the 1879 S Morgan Silver Dollar features the reverse design of 1879.

1879 S Morgan Dollars

 

The San Francisco Mint produced two major varieties including a coin using the earlier reverse of 1878.

1879-S $1 REVERSE OF 1878

 

How Rare is a 1879 Liberty Silver Dollar

Given that the coins are quite old, it’s not surprising that relatively few remain in pristine condition today. Out of the tens of millions of Liberty silver dollars that were originally minted, only a small percentage have survived the years in good condition. The rarity of the coin depends in part on where it was minted.

Series MINT Quantity minted
1879 Philadelphia  14,806,000
1879 Proof Philadelphia 1,100
1879 CC Carson 756,000
1879 O New Orleans 2,887,000
1879 O Proof New Orleans 12
1879 S San Francisco 9,110,000

Coins minted at Philadelphia mint are relatively common, as 14,806,000 were struck. In contrast, Carson City minted a much smaller number of coins, with only 756,000 Liberty silver dollars produced. As a result, Carson City mint coins are much rarer and more valuable. Proof coins are also quite rare, with only 1,100 ever minted. 9,110,000 coins were struck at the San Francisco mint and 2,887,000 at the New Orleans mint.

Although 1879 Morgan Silver Dollars were minted in large quantities for that time, many were melted down for their silver content during periods of economic hardship. As a result, these coins are now quite rare and valuable.

1879 Silver Dollar Value

A silver dollar from 1879 is worth, at minimum, its weight in silver. This melt value is calculated from the current silver spot price of $18.73 per ounce. So, a silver dollar from 1879 is worth around $14. However, the real price depends on the

condition and the series of the coin.

1879 Morgan Silver Dollar Price Chart

Type Very fine condition Extremely fine condition MS 60 MS 65 PR 63
1879 no mint mark $45 $50 $75 $575
1879 proof  –  –  –  – $3,750
1879 S silver dollar $42 $45 $235
1879 S Morgan Dollars : Reverse of 1878 $125 $185 $8,000
1879 O $45 $50 $2,450
1879 CC $525 $1,550 $23,000
1879 CC: CC Over CC $475 $1,450 $42,500

1879 Morgan Silver Dollar No Mint Mark Value

The 1879 silver dollar value, without a mint mark, is worth around $45 in very fine condition. In extremely fine condition, the value is around $50. An uncirculated coin with an MS 60 grade is worth about $75 and, with an MS 65 grade, around $575. The lack of a mint mark on the coin indicates that it was minted in Philadelphia. Philadelphia also produced proof coins which are valued at around $3,750 in PR 63 condition.

1879 S Silver Dollar Value

The 1879 S silver dollar value depends on the silver bullion variety. The 1879 S silver dollar with the second reverse is worth around $125 in very fine condition. In extremely fine condition the value is around $185. Uncirculated it is worth around $8,000 in MS 65 grade. The 1879 S silver dollar with the third reverse is worth around $42 in very fine condition. In extremely fine condition the value is around $45. Uncirculated it is worth around $235 in MS 65 grade.

1879 O Silver Dollar Value

The 1879 O Silver Dollar value is around $45 in very fine condition. In extremely fine condition the value is around $50. Uncirculated coins with a grade of MS 65 can fetch up to $2,450. The O mint mark on the coin indicates that it was minted in New Orleans.

1879 CC Silver Dollar Value

It’s important to note that there are two different types of Carson City silver dollars: those with the “CC” over “CC” mintmark and those with a clear “CC” mintmark. Either way, the 1879 CC silver dollar is a valuable coin that is sure to interest collectors.

The value of an 1879 CC silver dollar depends on the particular variety. The most valuable is the one with the CC over CC, which is worth around $475 in very fine condition. In extremely fine condition, the value jumps to around $1,450. Uncirculated coins with a grade of MS 65 can sell for an impressive $42,500.

The 1879 silver dollar with the clear CC is also valuable, although not as much as the other variety. In very fine condition, it is worth around $525. In extremely fine condition, it is worth around $1,550. Uncirculated coins with a grade of MS 65 can sell for around $23,000.

Factors Influencing the 1879 Morgan Silver Dollar Value

The Morgan silver dollar was minted from 1878 to 1904, and then again in 1921. Due to its long production run, there are a large number of Morgan dollars in circulation today. However, not all Morgans are created equal. Several factors can affect the value of a Morgan silver dollar, including condition, mint mark, and silver melt value.

To find how much is your 1879 Morgan silver dollar worth, the best idea is to compare to recently sold pieces. For example:

Condition

Obviously, a coin that is in good condition will be worth more than a coin that is heavily worn or damaged. When determining condition, collectors will look at factors such as the coin’s luster, strike, surface defects, and overall eye appeal.

The Sheldon grading scale is a system for assessing the condition of coins. It was developed by William H. Sheldon in 1949, and it is still used today by many numismatists. The scale goes from 0 to 70, with 0 being the lowest grade and 70 being the highest. Coins that are graded 60 or above are considered to be “Uncirculated,” meaning they have never been circulated or used. Sheldon’s scale has become the industry standard for coin grading, and it is used by major coin dealers and auction houses around the world.

Mint Mark

The mint mark indicates where the coin was manufactured, and can also influence the value. For example, dollars minted in Philadelphia (which did not include a mint mark) are generally worth less than those minted in Carson City (CC), New Orleans (O), San Francisco (S), or Denver (D). The reason for this is because Philadelphia produced more silver coins than other mints combined.

Silver Melt Value

Silver melt value is also an important consideration when determining the value of a Morgan silver dollar. The current price of silver on the open market can fluctuate, which can cause the melt value of a Morgan to rise or fall.

+The melt value of silver is the amount of money that you would get if you took a silver coin or bar and melted it down into pure silver. The melt value is different from the spot price, which is the current market price for silver. To calculate the melt value of your silver, you first need to know the purity of the silver. Pure silver is 99.9% silver, but most coins and bars are not pure silver.

FAQ

What is the difference between a Morgan silver dollar and a Liberty silver dollar?

Liberty silver dollars are a type of silver dollar that depict Lady Liberty on the obverse (front) side of the coin. The term “Liberty silver dollar” can refer to any silver dollar that depicts Lady Liberty, including the Morgan dollar and the Peace dollar.

What is the most valuable silver dollar?

One of the most valuable silver dollars is the Special Strike Flowing Hair Silver Dollar from 1794. This coin was sold for over 10 million dollars at an auction in 2013. The Special Strike Flowing Hair Silver Dollar is an extremely rare coin, with only a handful known to be in existence. The coin is considered to be one of the finest known examples of an early American silver dollar.

What are the most valuable years of the Morgan silver dollar?

The most valuable Morgan dollars include the 1889-CC, 1893-S, and 1895 (Proof only). These coins are rare and command high prices from collectors. The 1889-CC is the most common of the three, but it is still very rare in high grades. The 1893-S is even more scarce, and the 1895 Proof is the rarest of all. If you’re lucky enough to own one of these key date Morgan dollars, you have a true treasure.

How do you find the mint mark on a Morgan silver dollar?

Looking for the mint mark on a Morgan silver dollar? You’ll find it below the bow on the back of the coin, or under the tail of the bald eagle on the right. If there’s no mint mark, that means the coin was struck in Philadelphia. But what does that mint mark mean? Well, each mint mark corresponds to a different mint where the coin was struck. For example, a coin with an “S” mint mark was struck at the San Francisco Mint, while a coin with a “D” mint mark was struck at the Denver Mint.

Final Thoughts

The 1879 silver dollar is a classic piece of American currency. Though it is no longer in circulation, it remains a popular collector’s item. Its distinctive design, featuring Lady Liberty surrounded by stars, is instantly recognizable. The coin was minted in small numbers and was only circulated for a few years, making it quite rare.

So, how much is an 1879 dollar worth today? That depends on the condition of the coin and the mint mark. Circulated coins can be worth anywhere from $45 for a Philadelphia coin to $475 for a Carson City coin. Uncirculated coins in MS 65 condition are $575 for no mint mark dollar, $8,000 for 1879 S dollar, $2,450 for a 1879 O dollar and $23,000 for a 1879 CC dollar. So, if you have an 1879 silver dollar, be sure to check the condition and mint mark before selling it!

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