How Much is a 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Worth

Coins from Philadelphia, San Francisco and New Orleans are worth around $40 in circulated condition. Carson City coins are significantly more valuable, with a circulated coin worth around $550. Uncirculated coins are also more valuable, with Philadelphia and New Orleans coins worth from $60 to $220 and San Francisco coins worth from $300 to $2000. Carson City coins are the most valuable, with an uncirculated coin worth at least $1,250.

1885 was a banner year for a number of important events. In February, the Washington Monument was completed after more than 30 years of construction. The following month, Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was published. In May, the Statue of Liberty was dedicated in New York Harbor, and in the world of numismatics – the Morgan silver dollar continued to be produced.

Have you ever found an old coin tucked away in a drawer or hidden somewhere in your house? What if that coin was a 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar? How much is it worth? Depending on the condition of the coin, it could be worth quite a bit of money! In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at the 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar and how much it’s worth today. Stay tuned to find out more!

What are Morgan Silver Dollars?

Morgan Silver Dollars are United States coins minted from 1878 to 1904, and again in 1921. They were produced in small quantities until production ceased entirely in 1904. The Morgan Silver dollar was then reintroduced in 1921 and minted until 1928. The coin is named after its designer, George T. Morgan. The obverse (front) of the Morgan Silver Dollar depicts a profile of Liberty, while the reverse (back) depicts an eagle with outstretched wings.

George T. Morgan was an English engraver and designer of the United States silver dollar. He engraved portraits for British and American stamps, including the widely- circulated 1867 1-cent Benjamin Franklin stamp. In 1876, he was hired as an assistant engraver at the United States Mint in Philadelphia. There, he designed and engraved coins, including the popular Morgan silver dollar. George T. Morgan’s distinctive designs helped to shape American coinage for generations.

The Morgan Silver Dollar was one of the most popular coins of its time, and many of the coins produced during the 19th and early 20th centuries are still in circulation today. Because of their age and historical significance, Morgan Silver Dollars are highly sought-after by collectors. While most Morgans are worth only a few dollars above their silver content, some rare varieties can be worth tens of thousands of dollars or more.

1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Identification Guide

1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Identification Guide

1885 Morgan Silver Dollar

Location Year Minted
Philadelphia 1885 17,787,000
Philadelphia 1885 proof 930
San Francisco 1885 S 1,497,000
New Orleans 1885 O 9,185,000
Carson City 1885 CC 228,000
Total 1885 19,512,930

The 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar is a popular coin among collectors. This guide will help you to identify this coin so that you can add it to your collection. The 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar is composed of 90% silver and 10% copper. It weighs .77344 ounces of silver and has a total weight of 26.73 grams. The coin has a diameter of 38.1 mm.

The obverse of the coin depicts a profile portrait representing Liberty, with the words “E PLURIBUS UNUM” at the top and the date at the bottom (in this case 1885). The obverse side is surrounded by stars. The reverse of the coin depicts an eagle with wings outstretched, with the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA”, “IN GOD WE TRUST”, and “ONE DOLLAR” around it. The Morgan silver dollar is considered one of the most beautiful coins ever minted.

One of the most important things to look for is the mint mark. The mint mark indicates where the coin was minted, and it can be found on the reverse side of the coin, below the eagle. Coins without a mint mark were minted in Philadelphia, while those with an “CC” were minted in Carson City. Those with an “S” were minted in San Francisco, and those with an “O” were minted in New Orleans.

By keeping these things in mind, you’ll be able to quickly and easily identify a Morgan dollars.

Are 1885 Morgan Silver Dollars Rare?

Yes, the 1885 Morgan silver dollar is a relatively rare coin. While there were a total of 28,797,000 coins minted in 1885 (17,787,000 from Philadelphia, 9,185,000 from New Orleans, 1,497,000 from San Francisco, and 228,000 from Carson City), there were only 930 proof coins minted in Philadelphia.

Additionally, a high percentage of those coins were heavily circulated, which has led to even fewer examples surviving in high grades today. Likewise, during the Great Depression, many people turned to precious metals as a way to weather the economic storm, resulting in even more coins being melted down for their silver content. Consequently, 1885 Morgan silver dollars are now considered relatively rare, and they command a higher price than most other vintage silver dollars.

1885 Silver Dollar Value

Year Grade/Condition
Fine condition Extremely fine condition Uncirculated MS 60 Uncirculated MS 65
1885 $42 $45 $60 $220
1885 Proof $3,750
1881 S $42  $75 $300 $2,000
1881 O $42 $45 $60 $220
1881 CC $550 $600 $650 $1250

The value of an 1885 silver dollar depends on a few factors, including the condition of the coin and the mint mark. In general, all series are worth at least their weight in silver. The silver melt value for this coin is around $15 at the moment.

1885 P Morgan Silver Dollar Value

1885 Morgan Silver

1885 P Morgan Silver Dollar

Quality Value
Fine condition $42
Extremely fine condition $45
Uncirculated MS 60 $60
Uncirculated MS 65 $220
Proof PR 63 $3,750

Coins minted in Philadelphia don’t have a mint mark, and are worth around $42 in very fine condition. In extremely fine condition, the value is around $45. Uncirculated coins are worth $60 in MS 60 grade and around $220 in MS 65 grade.

Proof coins are specially made for collectors and have a higher value than regular coins. The 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar is worth $3,750 in PR 63 condition. Proof coins are more valuable because they are made with a higher quality of silver and have a shinier finish. They are also much rarer than regular coins, which makes them more sought after by collectors.

1885 O Morgan Silver Dollar Value

1885 O Morgan Silver

1881 O Morgan Silver Dollar

Quality Value
Fine condition $42
Extremely Fine condition $45
Uncirculated MS 60 $60
Uncirculated MS 65 $220

Although Philadelphia coins are more common, the price for an 1885 O Morgan Silver Dollar is similar because these two mints produced the most silver dollars in that year. In very fine condition, the coin is worth around $42. However, in extremely fine condition, the value jumps to $45. The real prize, however, is an Uncirculated coin. In MS 60 grade, an Uncirculated 1885 O Morgan Silver Dollar is worth $60. But in the higher MS 65 grade, the coin’s value skyrockets to $220.

1885 S Morgan Silver Dollar Value

1885 S Morgan Silver

1885 S Morgan Silver Dollar

Quality Value
Fine condition $45
Extremely Fine condition $75
Uncirculated MS 60 $300
Uncirculated MS 65 $2000

Minted in the San Francisco Mint, these coins are worth around $45 in very fine condition. In extremely fine condition, the value increases to around $75. However, the real value of these coins lies in their uncirculated condition. Uncirculated coins are worth $300 in MS 60 grade and around $2,000 in MS 65 grade.

1885 CC Morgan Silver Dollar Value

1885 CC Morgan Silver

1885 CC Morgan Silver Dollar

Quality Value
Fine condition $550
Extremely Fine condition $600
Uncirculated MS 60 $650
Uncirculated MS 65 $1250

A coin from the Carson City Mint (CC) is considered to be the rarest of all Morgan Silver Dollars and is thus worth more than coins from other mints. In general, a Morgan Silver Dollar in very fine condition is worth around $550, while an extremely fine coin can be worth around $600.

An Uncirculated coin with an MS 60 grade can sell for around $650, while an MS 65 coin can be worth around $1,250. Thus, if you are lucky enough to own a Morgan CC Silver Dollar, be sure to have it appraised so that you know its full value.

Factors Influencing 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Values

The value of an 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar depends on its condition, mint mark, and type of strike.

Condition

The value of a Morgan silver dollar depends largely on its condition. A circulated coin is one that has been used in everyday transactions and will show signs of wear, while an uncirculated coin is one that has been preserved in mint condition and appears as if it just came off the presses. On the Sheldon grading scale, a circulated coin would be graded at 60 or below, while an uncirculated coin would be graded at 70 or above. coins that fall in between these two grades are considered to be in “choice” condition.

There are a few factors that influence a coin’s grade. First, the type of wear will affect the value. Light surface wear is less damaging than deeper scratches or nicks. Second, the overall eye appeal of the coin will be taken into account. A coin with boldly struck features and bright luster will be worth more than a coin that is dull and lackluster.

Mint Mark

Among collectors of 1885 Morgan silver dollars, those minted in Carson City are the most highly prized. In fact, Carson City coins are so rare that they can command prices several times higher than those of more common varieties. The story of the Carson City Mint is a fascinating one. Established in 1863 during the height of the Civil War, the mint produced a limited number of coins during its brief history. As a result, Carson City dollars are among the most desirable items for collectors of American currency.

San Francisco coins are also highly sought after, though not as rare as those from Carson City. Like Carson City dollars, San Francisco coins command premium prices due to their scarcity. Philadelphia and New Orleans coins, while not as rare as those from other mints, are still relatively scarce. All four mints produced 1885 Morgan silver dollars, but the Carson City and San Francisco coins are by far the most valuable.

Type of Strike

When it comes to Morgan silver dollars, there are two main types of strikes: proofs and business strikes. While both types of coins are equally collectible, proof coins tend to be more valuable due to their scarcity. Business strike coins are those that were struck for circulation, while proof coins were specially made for collectors. Proof coins are usually struck multiple times, resulting in a higher quality image. In addition, they are often produced in smaller quantities than business strike coins. As a result, proof Morgan silver dollars tend to sell for a premium price.

How to Find value of Your Morgan Silver Dollars

If you’re lucky enough to have a Morgan silver dollar (or two, or three), congratulations! These coins are not only beautiful, but also quite valuable. But how do you know how much your coins are worth? Take a look at recent auction results for similar coins. This will give you a general idea of what collectors are willing to pay for coins in good condition. Of course, your coin may be worth more or less than the ones that have sold recently, but it’s a good starting point.

For example:

Final Thoughts

The 1885 Morgan silver dollar was minted at a time when the United States was enjoying a period of great prosperity. The country was in the midst of an industrial boom, and the population was growing rapidly. As a result, there was a large demand for silver dollars. The 1885 Morgan silver dollar is relatively common, but it is still highly valued by collectors.

In conclusion, an 1885 Morgan silver dollar is worth anywhere from $40 to $2,000, depending on the city of origin and the condition of the coin. Philadelphia, San Francisco and New Orleans Mint coins are generally worth less than Carson City coins, but this can vary depending on the individual coin. Uncirculated Carson City coins are by far the most valuable, worth at least $1,250. So, if you have an 1885 Morgan silver dollar in your collection, be sure to research its origins and condition in order to ascertain its value.

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